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The Cookstr Weekly: Cheese Please!

April 22, 2013
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As a broad category, cheese in some form is likely to make its way into nearly all declarations of ideal last suppers and favorite foods. It’s a textural delight, hitting points from creamy (a warm baked goat cheese or brie) to chewy (halloumi) to light-as-air ricotta and, of course, stringy, melty mozzarella.

With the exception of the vegan and lactose free among us, we all have a few standbys – I tend to sprinkle a few tablespoons of Gorgonzola over almost every salad, and knife-sharp Cheddar can liven up anything from a ripe pear to a bowl of vegetarian chili. The below recipes aim to widen those horizons, creating combinations of taste that encourage you to rediscover that dairy delight.

Warmest regards,
Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

by Victoria Blashford-Snell and Brigitte Hafner

Feta cheese, mixed into the dough for these crunchy snacks, adds a richness to the flavor that’s enhanced when the tops of the squares are browned in the oven. Poppy seeds (which happen to be, full disclosure, my favorite addition to any savory baked good) add some textural and visual variety. It might seem a bit counterintuitive or overly DIY to bake your own guilty pleasure snack foods, but it’s nice to savor the crunch of personal accomplishment while you’re mindlessly tossing back crackers and watching Netflix.

More Cheesy Recipes from Cookstr

Cracked Black Pepper Parmesan Crisps by Steve McDonagh and Dan Smith

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Orecchiette with Three Cheeses by Viktorija Todorovska

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Francese (‘in the French style’) refers to the light coating of flour and egg applied to veal or chicken that’s pounded into thin cutlets and dressed with a sauce of lemon and capers. In this version by Marlon Braccia, jarred artichoke hearts are sautéed in butter, ultimately becoming a part of the same lemony sauce. Broccolini served alongside adds color to the dish and a fresh counterpoint to the veal. Ask your butcher to filet the veal cutlets under a half an inch thick, or pound them with mallet to reach the desired thinness.

 

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