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The Cookstr Weekly: Celebrating Thanksgiving and Hanukkah

November 22, 2013
This year, for the first time in the history of Thanksgiving, it will coincide with Hanukkah on November 28 for a day that’s been referred to as Thanksgivukkah. While you might only celebrate one, the overlap of the holidays inspires possibilities for cuisine cross-contamination. Seasonal favorites like sweet potatoes and apples fit traditionally into both menus, while other inventions (Challah stuffing? Pumpkin latkes?) are up to your imagination.
I started adding kasha varnishkes to my Thanksgiving menu a few years ago, finding that the onion-filled, buttery, pilaf-like dish fit perfectly between creamy mashed potatoes and tender gravy-soaked turkey. The classic fried doughnuts of Hanukkah, made with apples or sweet potatoes, are an ideal addition to an over-the-top Thanksgiving spread. What are you cooking this year? We’d love to hear all about it!

Warmest regards,

Kara Rota
Editorial Director
Cookstr

Slow-Roasted Herbed Turkey Breast
  by Molly Stevens

It isn’t Thanksgiving without a turkey. This slow-roasted breast is ideal for a smaller group, or when you simply want to make room at the table for even more sides! Fresh sage, rosemary, thyme, and celery seeds flavor the poultry. Serving this alongside your favorite brisket recipe, if you have a lot of mouths to feed, would make for a spectacular Thanksgivukkah feast. And trust me: you can make some truly excellent turkey matzoh ball soup with the leftovers.

More Thanksgiving and Hanukkah Recipes 

Walnut Challah by Faye Levy
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Sweet Potato and Apple Latkes with Ginger Orange Dipping Sauce
by Jon Ashton 
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Cracklings by Mimi Sheraton
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Sweet Potato Doughnuts with Roast Apple Filling by Pichet Ong
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Pumpkin Flan by Claudia Roden

  by Paula Haney 

The secret ingredient in this recipe is red wine vinegar. Vinegar, like vodka, is sometimes added to pie dough to promote a really flaky crumb. Both ingredients, acid and alcohol, help to prevent gluten formation. Paula Haney writes, “This is the most important recipe at the pie shop. It is the secret to ninety percent of the pies we make, both sweet and savory. New bakers aren’t considered full members of the pie team until they master it.”

 

2 Comments leave one →
  1. November 29, 2013 10:05 pm

    Today, I went to the beach front with my children. I
    found a sea shell and gave it to my 4 year old daughter and said
    “You can hear the ocean if you put this to your ear.” She placed the shell to her ear and screamed.
    There was a hermit crab inside and it pinched her ear.

    She never wants to go back! LoL I know this is entirely off topic but I had
    to tell someone!

  2. December 20, 2013 5:14 pm

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